Smoking After Giving Birth

I wanted to think I would have a seamless transition of staying an ex-smoker after childbirth. Sadly no, that was not the case. Here are some reasons why:

Even though this birthing experience was slightly shorter than my first and second, bringing another person into this world is hard work! After the stress and worry was finally over (for that phase of parenthood) I really, really had the urge to “calm down”, “take the edge off” or “reward myself” with a cigarette.

  • I’m not exactly one that loves staying hospitals and a couple quick “mommy-breaks” were needed.
  • Once we got home, there was still a need for that mommy-break.

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How Do the Holidays Affect Your Quitting?

Luckily, since I smoke outside and not in my home, I get a little deterred from smoking too much during the winter. It’s cold in Canada! But…I still find it harder to quit smoking during the holidays. Here are some reasons why:

I get the feeling of wanting to indulge. Since a smoke right after eating a meal, especially a large meal, is very satisfying for me I find it very tempting to eat lots of yummy things and then follow up with a smoke. Continue reading

My Top Five Reasons That Make It Hard to Quit – Part 2 The Things I do to Make It Easier

In my last post, I talked about the top reasons why it’s hard for me to quit smoking. This week, I’m revisiting these reasons and discussing strategies that help me overcome my urge.

1. Routine – The routine or habit of smoking when I wake up, after a meal, at the bus stop, at the next bus stop, with a coffee, with a coffee at the bus stop, the list goes on.

  • I change the routine by one small thing at a time. I do something else, something positive and fun to distract myself from the old habit.
  • To distract myself at the bus stop I read a book that grabs and keeps my attention, or surf Facebook or the internet on my phone;

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Think Nicotine Calms You Physically? Think Again.

As a smoker, I always thought that taking that edge off of my nicotine cravings helped to ease my nerves by having a cigarette. The habit/addiction led my brain to believe that having a cigarette calmed me down.

It wasn’t until I started attending my smoking cessation counselling that I learned that nicotine actually makes peoples’ blood pressure and heart rate higher. In fact, the nurses in this program check my blood pressure at every appointment to make sure it hasn’t dipped too low after quitting smoking. It was insightful and a welcomed change to SEE how quitting affected my blood pressure. Continue reading